The Parsee and the Rhinoceros

From How the Rhinoceros Got His Skin

By Rudyard Kipling

The Parsee and the Rhinoceros

This is the picture of the Parsee beginning to eat his cake on the Uninhabited Island in the Red Sea on a very hot day; and of the Rhinoceros coming down from the Altogether Uninhabited Interior, which, as you can truthfully see, is all rocky. The Rhinoceros’s skin is quite smooth, and the three buttons that button it up are underneath, so you can’t see them. The squiggly things on the Parsee’s hat are the rays of the sun reflected in more-than-oriental splendour, because if I had drawn real rays they would have filled up all the picture. The cake has currants in it; and the wheel-thing lying on the sand in front belonged to one of Pharaoh’s chariots when he tried to cross the Red Sea. The Parsee found it, and kept it to play with. The Parsee’s name was Pestonjee Bomonjee, and the Rhinoceros was called Strorks, because he breathed through his mouth instead of his nose. I wouldn’t ask anything about the cooking-stove if I were you.

 

Illustrations by Rudyard Kipling. Grateful acknowledgment to Russell Tayler, Newcastle, Australia for providing the artwork and accompanying text.

Public domain text courtesy of Project Gutenberg. Project Gutenberg license and trademark information.

Page copyright © 2007 by Daniel M. Short

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